You are reading Bass, Berry, and Sims’ new enforcement roundup, where we bring notable enforcement actions, policy changes, interesting news articles and a bit of our insight to your inbox every month.

October 2022 was an active month for enforcement, with the Department of Treasury updating Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS) guidelines and the Departments of Justice (DOJ) and Commerce (DOC) taking multiple actions. To stay up to date, subscribe to our GovCon & Trade blog. If you have questions about any of the actions mentioned and how they relate to your business, contact our international trade team. We welcome your feedback and encourage sharing this newsletter with anyone who may be interested.

Overview

  • Russia continues to be the focus of enforcement efforts. On October 14, the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS), and the Department of State issued an alert detailing how U.S. government measures have impacted the Russian military-industrial complex and targeted sanctions evaders. Some highlights are detailed further below.
  • October was a busy month for Chinaspecific enforcement actions and regulatory changes, which were headlined by the new China-related Semiconductor rules. These rules seek to restrict China’s ability to access both U.S. advanced chips and U.S talent. These new controls will have a major impact on the Chinese and American chip industries and may signal more changes to come.
  • Seagate Technology Holdings, an American data storage company, was issued a “proposed charging letter” for potentially unauthorized business transactions with Huawei.
  • Cryptocurrency was also a target of enforcement in October. An American virtual currency firm based in Washington state settled 116,421 violations of multiple sanctions programs, and agreed to pay a penalty of more than $24 million.
  • Following a Presidential Order linking CFIUS reviews directly to the president’s national security prerogatives, the Department of Treasury released new CFIUS Enforcement and Penalty Guidelines.
  • The Commerce Department also updated antiboycott rules to strengthen penalties and bolster compliance.

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Photo of Mi-Yong Kim Mi-Yong Kim

Mi-Yong Kim has nearly 25 years of experience related to export controls and national security. Based on her extensive government service, she is uniquely well equipped to provide advice to help clients navigate the complex regulations related to export controls and national security…

Mi-Yong Kim has nearly 25 years of experience related to export controls and national security. Based on her extensive government service, she is uniquely well equipped to provide advice to help clients navigate the complex regulations related to export controls and national security, including matters related to compliance with the Export Administration Regulations (EAR); the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR); the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS); and foreign ownership, control, or influence (FOCI) mitigation by the Defense Security Service. Mi-Yong is also an Adjunct Professor at the National Chengchi University (NCCU) in Taipei, Taiwan. She teaches a graduate-level class on export controls and related topics at the College of International Affairs of NCCU.

Photo of Thad McBride Thad McBride

Thad McBride advises public and private companies on the legal considerations essential to successful business operations in a global marketplace. He focuses his practice on counseling clients on compliance with U.S. export regulations (ITAR and EAR), economic sanctions and embargoes, import controls (CBP)…

Thad McBride advises public and private companies on the legal considerations essential to successful business operations in a global marketplace. He focuses his practice on counseling clients on compliance with U.S. export regulations (ITAR and EAR), economic sanctions and embargoes, import controls (CBP), and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). He also advises clients on anti-boycott controls, and assists companies with matters involving the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). Thad supports international companies across a range of industries, including aviation, automotive, defense, energy, financial services, manufacturing, medical devices, oilfield services, professional services, research and development, retail, and technology. Beyond advising on day-to-day compliance matters, Thad regularly assists clients in investigations and enforcement actions brought by government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), the U.S. Treasury Department Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), the U.S. State Department Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC), Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the U.S. Commerce Department Bureau of Industry & Security (BIS), and the Securities & Exchange Commission.

Photo of Sylvia Yi Sylvia Yi

Sylvia Yi represents businesses across a broad range of sectors as they move through the contracting process with federal, state and local governments, and when they engage in international transactions. Sylvia counsels public and private companies on day to day compliance challenges, and…

Sylvia Yi represents businesses across a broad range of sectors as they move through the contracting process with federal, state and local governments, and when they engage in international transactions. Sylvia counsels public and private companies on day to day compliance challenges, and supports clients in responding to criminal and government investigations. She is a regular contributor to the firm’s Government Contracts & International Trade Blog, where she provides insight on the demanding and ever-changing regulatory environment.