False Claims Act

The government continues to prioritize fraud involving government contractors, as the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) most recent annual report on civil fraud recovery shows.

Although the majority of government recoveries are related to the healthcare industry, the government still recovered hundreds of millions of dollars in 2022 alone not related to the healthcare industry. Government

Numet Machining Techniques, a Connecticut-based machined parts manufacturer for commercial and military aerospace engines, recently agreed to pay $5.2 million to settle alleged violations of the False Claims Act (FCA) for misrepresenting its size standard following an acquisition.
Continue Reading Buyer Beware: Settling FCA Allegations Costs Manufacturer $5.2 Million

Last week, the District Court for the Eastern District of California denied the defendant’s motion for summary judgment of a False Claims Act (FCA) count against Aerojet Rocketdyne (Aerojet) for allegedly fraudulently inducing the government to enter into federal contracts when the company knew it was not compliant with cybersecurity requirements.

The order contains important lessons for government contractors in the emerging area of FCA liability based on noncompliance with cybersecurity obligations. While the litigation is ongoing and may ultimately be resolved in Aerojet’s favor, the order demonstrates the growing importance of cybersecurity compliance.Continue Reading Government Contractors Face False Claims Act Liability for Cybersecurity Non-Compliance

There is a new weapon in the Department of Justice’s (DOJ’s) already powerful False Claims Act (FCA) arsenal.  In October 2021, the DOJ announced a new Civil Cyber-Fraud Initiative, under which it will pursue FCA liability against government contractors in the cybersecurity space.  According to the announcement from Deputy Attorney General Lisa O. Monaco, the

This past January, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that procurement fraud recoveries comprised the second largest category of fraud recoveries in Fiscal Year (FY) 2020, a trend that continued from FY 2019. With last November’s announcement of DOJ’s intent to expand its Procurement Collusions Strike Force (PCSF), we expect to see a continued trend

Two Washington, D.C. area government contractors have agreed to pay the government for their respective roles in defrauding the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) in schemes to fraudulently obtain government contracts set aside for small businesses.  These two cases highlight the importance of small business compliance and the submission of accurate and complete certifications.
Continue Reading Small Business Fraud Leads to Large Monetary Liability in Recent Cases

This Post at a Glance:

  • Company made false statements related to import duty charges
  • Investigation initiated by whistleblower complaint from company’s competitor
  • Trump Administration likely to impose more anti-dumping duties

On February 6, 2018, the Department of Justice (DOJ) announced that Home Furnishings Resource Group Inc. (HFRG), of Hermitage, Tennessee, agreed to a $500,000 settlement to resolve allegations that the company violated the False Claims Act (FCA). The DOJ contended that HFRG made false statements on customs declarations to avoid paying anti-dumping duties on wooden bedroom furniture that HFRG imported from China between 2009 and 2014.Continue Reading Tennessee Company Skirts Customs Obligations, Pays $500,000 FCA Penalty

Last month, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Washington denied a motion to limit damages against a government contractor, United States ex rel. Savage v. Washington Closure Hanford LLC, where the government sought several categories of damages for alleged False Claims Act (FCA) violations.  With a case centered on a nuclear waste company falsely certifying compliance with small business plan participation requirements, the Court ruled that damages would not be limited to remedies provided in the contract.
Continue Reading Court Rejects Cap on FCA Damages for Allegations of Subcontracting Plan Fraud

A recent report from the Department of Defense (DoD) Inspector General (IG) identified a number of significant flaws regarding the Defense Logistics Agency’s (DLA) compliance with the Buy American Act (BAA) and the Berry Amendment.  The IG’s findings will likely result in a renewed focus on both BAA and Berry Amendment compliance.  As a result, contractors are likely to experience increased frustration as they seek to remain aligned with DLA policies.  The IG’s report also draws further attention to the previously discussed government-wide effort by President Trump to both enhance compliance with the BAA as presently drafted and potentially strengthen the BAA through legislative action in the future.
Continue Reading DoD IG Report Highlights Flaws in DLA Compliance with Buy American Act and Berry Amendment